Less Pain for You

One of the books I’ve been reading this week is Atomic Habits by James Clear. I can recommend it. There are many great ideas and stories there.

The purpose of this post is to share one idea that made me laugh out loud.

The Truth About Talent is the title for chapter 18. In it, James outlines a series of questions to help you hone in on the area you should focus on, based on your personality and genetics, to have the best chance of success. He mentions that you can find your niche by noticing that thing that you do that causes you less pain then it causes others!

The mark of whether you are made for a task is not whether you love it but whether you can handle the pain of the task easier than other people.

~James Clear, Atomic Habits

I found that hilarious but real. It’s another way of finding your strengths. Usually, the idea is to list what people often ask you to do. Or you list things others often appreciate that you do. It’s a way of recognizing something that is so obvious to other people but which you find so easy as to render it invisible to you.

The work that hurts you less than it hurts others is the work you are made to do.

~James Clear, Atomic Habits

Based on our natural inclination to compare ourselves to others, it becomes straightforward to remember and to recognize such tasks. I found James Clear’s questions in this section helped me realize several qualities I hadn’t entirely clarified for myself. Although his wording made me giggle, the question can help with identifying essential distinctions to consider in career choice.

Try it and see if the idea helps you become more aware of your own unique combination of personal qualities that should be a part of your professional brand and daily focus in your work.

39. Boredom Antidote for Jayjay

If you notice you are feeling bored, it means you’ve probably been thinking about how you have nothing you want to do. In general feeling bored means you need more engagement, and that’s all.

How quickly do we jump into exaggerated thoughts about this condition though? How quickly does a simple, “I’m bored” turn into “My LIFE is so boring” or “Everyone else is having so much fun” or worse of all we can jump right into an existential crisis with “What am I even doing here?!”

What needs to happen is we need to interrupt a thought pattern like that very early in the chain of thoughts long before we get to the fit throwing stage.

We need to form a new thought habit. We need to diminish the angst around being bored and know we can find our way out of it through rest or soaking up some nature time or, easiest to apply in any situation, change the direction of our thoughts.

Mentions*:

Emotions as Pointers

What if emotions aren’t given so much emphasis? What if they simply indicate the way we’ve been focusing our thoughts?

Maybe emotions are just data to consider and if that’s true, maybe we can intentionally lead our emotions where we want them to be.

Have you ever noticed that you are able to muster up certain emotions you want? How did you do it?

Have you ever seen an athlete prepare mentally for their event? Or thought of how an actor might have prepared for an emotional scene? How do you think they do it?

Do you think it might be possible to get ahead of emotions as a regular way of being? If so, what an advantage it would be to be able to plan in advance how we would prefer to feel and know exactly how to hang out there more often.